‘Army Wives’ learns that ‘The Art of Separation’ is hard

The third episode of Army Wives touches on the hardest part of being part of a military family in ‘The Art of Separation.”  Whoever said that absence makes the heart grows fonder obviously wasn’t a member of the military community.  This installment covered not only the impact of deployment during the separation, but also the effect on family life both before and after.

Roxy and TrevorFor instance, newlyweds Roxy (Sally Pressman) and Trevor (Drew Fuller), instead of spending their time getting to know each other, are discussing wills and the possibility of Trevor not returning from this deployment.  Watching Trevor give the “tenderfoots” a lesson in how to care for the prized automobile so they can keep it in working order for their mom while Trevor is gone was priceless. 

I really like Trevor.  For such a young guy, he really seems to have his priorities right.  I love that he wants to adopt Roxy’s boys not because he might die in Iraq, but because he wants them to know what it feels like to be wanted.  But the best part was the lecture he gave Jesse (Roxy’s ex and TJ’s dad) about parenthood when he suddenly showed up and wanted to play daddy to win Roxy back instead of signing the adoption papers.  But sign the papers he did and Trevor secretly left them on the table for Roxy to find.

Meanwhile, Denise (Catherine Bell) is dealing with the current separation from her husband and single parenthood.  The phone conversation between Denise and the Major (Terry Serpico) was bittersweet (and that was before I knew that her husband was on the downed Blackhawk helicopter), not only because of the distance their love was enduring, but also because she had to lie to him about her son.  Anyone who has a spouse that travels knows the importance of these little white lies.  No sense worrying your spouse about something they can’t do anything about from where they are — it’ll usually wait until they get home.

I am, however, very proud of Denise for standing up to Jeremy (Richard Bryant).  And apparently her showdown with him inspired Jeremy to confess his problem to Colonel Holden (Brian McNamara) and seek help.  I glad that the Colonel didn’t let him off easy and is making Jeremy tell his dad what he did.

On the other hand, Pamela (Brigid Brannagh) and her husband overcame a different type of separation — an emotional one — with a rather public announcement of Pamela’s surrogacy.  But telling the truth seemed to set Pamela free and Chase (Jeremy Davidson), sporting new facial hair, found a new respect for his wife.

It was nice to see the pair send their children over to Roxy who gladly embraced “scone duty.”  I only wish I had neighbors that close to share “scone duty” with.  Parenthood does have its disadvantages.

Claudia JoyClaudia Joy (Kim Delaney) and Michael had parenthood issues of their own when their daughter Amanda (Kim Allen) was arrested in Columbia for carrying a “honk for peace” sign at a demonstration while wearing her school uniform.  Luckily, the incident won’t keep Amanda from attending UVA in the fall.  And Amanda’s desire to bring the troops home didn’t stop her from staying up all night to make CDs of 70s music to send to the soldiers in the care packages the families were putting together.  But that didn’t stop Lenore Baker (Rhonda Griffis) from belittling Claudia Joy in front of the others.  I really can’t stand the general’s wife.

And lastly, Roland (Sterling K. Brown) and Joan (Wendy Davis) are still dealing with the consequences of a two-year separation on their marriage.  I like this storyline the least, not because Roland is the spouse left at home, but because it’s the only relationship that doesn’t seem to be moving forward.  I so want Joan to get some help!

All in all, a solid episode.  I’m looking forward to next week’s episode and finding out what happened to Denise’s husband.  But I’m guessing from the preview with all the wives in black, that it’s not good.

For more articles on Army Wives, click here.

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